Las Vegas Strip Bridge Ban Faces Lawsuit Over Alleged Discrimination Against Disabled Individuals

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The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has filed a federal lawsuit against Clark County, which includes Las Vegas, on behalf of a woman who suffered a spinal injury. 

The woman claims that the county unfairly targeted her because it recently imposed a ban on standing or stopping while crossing pedestrian bridges on the Strip.

The ordinance, which took effect a month ago, classifies stopping, standing, or engaging in activities causing others to stop on Strip pedestrian bridges as a misdemeanor. This also applies within a 20-foot radius of connected stairs, elevators, and escalators. 

However, the ban does not exempt people with disabilities who may need to pause due to their condition, leading to accusations of discrimination.

Lisa McAllister, the plaintiff in the lawsuit, relies on a wheelchair and frequently stops unexpectedly due to fatigue, wheelchair malfunctions, or blocked paths. 

The court action from Las Vegas claims that the rule violates the rights of people like McAllister by virtually prohibiting them from using pedestrian bridges, which discourages them from going back to the Strip.

Las Vegas Ordinance Intentions

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has filed a federal lawsuit against Clark County, which includes Las Vegas, on behalf of a woman who suffered a spinal injury.
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has filed a federal lawsuit against Clark County, which includes Las Vegas, on behalf of a woman who suffered a spinal injury.

The ACLU of Nevada is seeking to have the ordinance struck down, contending that it not only violates the rights of people with disabilities but also infringes on First Amendment rights, including the freedom to protest or perform on the street.

The county spokesperson did not comment specifically on the lawsuit but had previously stated that the ordinance aims to enhance public safety by maintaining a continuous flow of pedestrian traffic across the bridges.

The county emphasized that the measure is not intended to target street performers or individuals taking pictures but is designed to ensure the safety of the tourism destination.

As the legal battle unfolds, the ACLU argues that the county’s ordinance goes beyond public safety concerns and encroaches on constitutionally protected activities. 

The decision of this lawsuit in Las Vegas may have an impact on how local governments strike a balance between public safety regulations and people’s rights, especially those to use public venues without discrimination.

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