New York City Move of Migrants from Tent Shelter to School Sparks Criticism Amidst Storm Concerns

1,415

NYC’s move of 2,000 migrants from a tent to a high school overnight, ahead of an approaching storm, faces criticism from parents, officials, and advocacy groups.

The move, aimed at ensuring the well-being of migrants at the Floyd Bennett Field shelter in Brooklyn, drew criticism for the city’s continued use of an exposed location susceptible to coastal flooding.

Mayor Eric Adams justified the relocation, citing expected winds of up to 70 mph and the need for precautionary measures. 

However, the use of the tent shelter in a vulnerable area had already been a contentious issue, as Floyd Bennett Field lacks proximity to essential services, schools, and transportation.

Images captured on Tuesday night depicted migrants being dropped off in yellow school buses, with James Madison High School in Brooklyn being repurposed as a temporary overnight respite center. As a result, classes were conducted virtually on Wednesday, leading to frustration among some parents who held a rally at the school.

Navigating Backlash Amid Migrant Influx

new-york-city-move-of-migrants-from-tent-shelter-to-school-sparks-criticism-amidst-storm-concerns
NYC’s move of 2,000 migrants from a tent to a high school overnight, ahead of an approaching storm, faces criticism from parents, officials, and advocacy groups.

State Assemblyman Michael Novakhov, representing the area, expressed dissatisfaction with the decision, emphasizing that the school was not an appropriate place for migrants, especially at the expense of the students. He suggested utilizing abandoned commercial properties instead of Floyd Bennett Field.

The decision also faced criticism from advocacy groups, including the Legal Aid Society and the Coalition for the Homeless, who questioned the appropriateness of Floyd Bennett Field as a shelter. They raised concerns about the potential trauma and disruption to migrant families.

Councilwoman Inna Vernikov called for an end to using public schools as shelters and expressed concerns about the impact on local residents and school environments. 

Desiree Joy Frias from South Bronx Mutual Aid urged a focus on moving people into permanent shelters to facilitate job opportunities.

Zach Iscol, the commissioner of New York City Emergency Management, revealed that the school received hate calls and a bomb threat, calling these actions criminal offenses. 

Despite the backlash, the city continues to grapple with accommodating the influx of migrants, projecting a spending of $4.7 billion in fiscal year 2024 to provide shelter, food, and services for asylum-seekers.

Comment via Facebook

Corrections: If you are aware of an inaccuracy or would like to report a correction, we would like to know about it. Please consider sending an email to [email protected] and cite any sources if available. Thank you. (Policy)


Comments are closed.