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Michigan Court Blocks Request to Eliminate Donald Trump from 2024 Primary Election

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Michigan’s Supreme Court decisively rejected a challenge by state voters against Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy citing the Constitution’s insurrection clause.

This rejection upholds the decision allowing Trump’s name to remain on the Republican presidential primary ballot, dismissing the attempt to exclude him from contention.

The appeal, brought forth by four voters contesting Trump’s candidacy under Section 3 of the 14th Amendment, which disqualifies individuals engaged in insurrection from holding office, was met with a brief order of denial by the Michigan Supreme Court. 

This decision, made by the seven justices, indicates their lack of persuasion to review the matter further.

Despite the dissent of Justice Elizabeth Welch, who highlighted that the secretary of state lacks the authority to exclude a candidate once put forward by a political party, the majority upheld the Court of Appeals’ ruling. 

Welch asserted that Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson must include Trump on the primary ballot irrespective of his potential disqualification under the insurrection clause.

Michigan and Colorado’s Ballot Contrasts

michigan-court-blocks-request-to-eliminate-donald-trump-from-2024-primary-election
Michigan’s Supreme Court decisively rejected a challenge by state voters against Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy citing the Constitution’s insurrection clause.

Trump lauded the Michigan Supreme Court’s decision, characterizing it as a rejection of a Desperate Democrat attempt to bar him from the ballot.

The Michigan case, distinct from the Colorado ruling that temporarily bars Trump from their primary ballot pending an appeal, centers on legal technicalities. 

Notably, the Michigan Court of Claims and the subsequent Court of Appeals avoided addressing Trump’s eligibility under the insurrection clause, citing limitations on the judiciary’s involvement in political questions.

In Michigan, the courts emphasized the administrative role of the Secretary of State in primary elections, underscoring that candidate placement primarily falls under the domain of political parties. 

The judicial consensus maintained that determining primary ballot candidates rests chiefly with the political parties and individual candidates, rather than the Secretary of State.

This decision marks a pivotal moment in the ongoing legal battles surrounding Trump’s candidacy, setting a distinct precedent in the interpretation of election laws and the constitutional framework regarding potential disqualifications for presidential aspirants based on historical clauses enacted post-Civil War.

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