Northern Mexico Grapples with Overwhelming Influx of 11,000 Migrants

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Thousands of migrants continue to seek entry into the United States, either through illegal crossings or by waiting in shelters and camps along the Mexican border. 

In the midst of a divided Washington concerning immigration policies, over 11,000 individuals remain stranded, hoping to enter legally through pathways established by the Biden administration.

In various border cities like Tijuana, Reynosa, and Matamoros in Mexico, migrants from countries such as Mexico, Cuba, Haiti, and Venezuela are sheltered, totaling around 11,073 individuals, as reported by community leaders. 

Enrique Lucero, the director of municipal migration affairs in Tijuana, estimates approximately 3,800 migrants staying in shelters. 

Similarly, Hector Silva, overseeing Senda De Vida shelters in Reynosa, accounts for 3,273 migrants, while Glady Cañas, managing Ayudandoles a Triunfar in Matamoros, states roughly 4,000 migrants occupy camps, shelters, and abandoned homes.

Despite the challenging circumstances, some migrants are relying on technological aids like the CBP One app, streamlining the process of scheduling asylum appointments with border patrol. 

Ongoing Mexico-US Border Diplomacy

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Thousands of migrants continue to seek entry into the United States, either through illegal crossings or by waiting in shelters and camps along the Mexican border.

The situation with Mexico at the border is still dire, nevertheless, a recent upsurge resulted in almost 9,600 daily interactions in December a sharp rise over earlier months.

Tragically, some migrants attempting illegal crossings have lost their lives, drowning in the Rio Grande in the Matamoros area. 

Though they frequently don’t give a whole picture of the hazards and intricacies involved, words from people who have successfully entered the US despite these risks serve as motivation for prospective migrants from Mexico. For a lot of refugees, the reality is still dire. 

Since May, the Department of Homeland Security has deported or returned over 445,000 individuals who crossed the southern border. The federal government has grappled with resource limitations, resulting in closed ports of entry and reassignments of personnel to manage the influx.

Problems still exist, despite efforts to resolve the situation. The problem of immigration and border security continues to be a major concern for both Mexico and the United States, with high-level meetings planned to discuss this rapidly worsening situation. 

Although one group of migrants in Eagle Pass, Texas, has been processed, illegal crossings persist, supported by certain groups and occasional halts owing to violence in areas bordering the US.

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