UK Study Indicates Multiple COVID Vax Boosters Can Reduce Resistance to Variants; Results In “Immune Imprinting,” System Deficiencies

Dr. Malone
Dr. Robert Malone, a physician and biochemist who is one of the developers of the mRNA technology that is the basis for today’s coronavirus vaccines, claimed that the results of the UK study provide an answer for why individuals who have received multiple booster jabs have been more prone to be hospitalized – and even dying – from “severe” cases of COVID.

EUROPE – A new United Kingdom medical study that examined workers from the health care industry that had received more than one booster shot of COVID-19 vaccines after having been infected with the original strain of the virus indicates that their immune system can actually grow more vulnerable to re-infection by the virus’ Omicron variant.

Dr. Robert Malone, a physician and biochemist who is one of the developers of the mRNA technology that is the basis for today’s coronavirus vaccines, claimed that the results of the UK study provide an answer for why individuals who have received multiple booster jabs have been more prone to be hospitalized – and even dying – from “severe” cases of COVID.

Malone described the process by which multiple vaccinations can result in immune system deficiencies as “immune imprinting.” This means, Malone explained, that being exposed to a particular strain of virus can actually inhibit the human body from being able to create sufficient antibodies when exposed to a more recent strain of the virus.

The process of receiving multiple booster shots can actually increase this effect, he said, whereas those who have so-called natural immunity” to COVID via a previous infection are not encountering these issues in the same numbers.


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“All over the world, we are seeing these datasets that show that, unfortunately, the people that are dying and being hospitalized are overwhelmingly the highly vaccinated,” he said. “It is not those that have natural immunity.”

Currently, the COVID-19 vaccines that are available for the public are based on the original strain of the virus, known as SARS-CoV-2. However, multiple mutated variant strains of the virus have emerged, which each one proving in many cases to be more and more resistant to the current crop of vaccines than the original.

Given the fact that COVID-19 vaccines are created utilizing components of the original strain of the virus – which Malone said no longer exists – the human body will begin to react to any variant strain it encounters as if it was the original. Thus, the body will become conditioned to react only to aspects of the original strain and essentially ignore any aspect of it that is in any way different, weakening the immune system’s response in the process.

“The literature on immune imprinting is bombproof. Paper after paper after paper now, in the top peer-reviewed journals from the top laboratories all across the world, are documenting it,” Malone said. “If that antigen has changed slightly, if that virus has changed slightly, [the immune system] still reacts as if it’s the old one.”

To solidify his stance on the topic, Malone claimed that countries with the lowest vaccination rates tend to be the ones with the lowest morality rates when it comes to COVID-19, adding that “It’s likely that we’re going to continue to see this trend” as time goes forward.


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