MYSTERY: Doctors Urging People Under 40 to Get Hearts Checked Amid Surge In “Sudden Adult Death Syndrome”

Sudden Adult Death Syndrome
Cardiologist and researcher Dr. Elizabeth Paratz noted that, since SADS-related deaths occur so quickly upon onset, that it makes it difficult to determine the cause, or to get the patient the proper medical treatment they need to save their life in a timely manner. File photo: Phovoir, Shutter Stock, licensed.

MELBOURNE, AU – Amid a frightening recent surge of unexplained deaths among individuals under the age of 40, doctors are urging people to get heart checkups to make sure they aren’t at risk for what is known as “Sudden Adult Death Syndrome” (SADS).

SADS, which essentially serves as a blanket term pertaining to any young person – typically under the age of 40 – who passes away unexpectedly without an obvious cause of death, can occur to people of any lifestyle, regardless of if they are overweight or if they exercise regularly and eat a healthy diet.

The SADS Foundation, based in the United States, notes that cases of SADS occur among approximately 4,000 people every year, with typical warning signs consisting of a family history of SADS, fainting or having seizures while exercising or being startled or excited.


FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION: GET ONLY 'FEATURED' STORIES BY EMAIL

Big Tech is using a content filtering system for online censorship. Watch our short video about NewsGuard to learn how they control the narrative for the Lamestream Media and help keep you in the dark. NewsGuard works with Big-Tech to make it harder for you to find certain content they feel is 'missing context' or stories their editors deem "not in your best interest" - regardless of whether they are true and/or factually accurate. They also work with payment processors and ad-networks to cut off revenue streams to publications they rate poorly by their same bias standards. This should be criminal in America. You can bypass this third-world nonsense by signing up for featured stories by email and get the good stuff delivered right to your inbox.
 

The Melbourne-based Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia – which experiences about 750 SADS cases annually in people under 50, normally from cardiac arrest – is currently developing the country’s first SADS registry, combining ambulance, hospital and forensics information. However, some causes of SADS-related death remain unclear in the country even after autopsies have been performed, experts say.

Cardiologist and researcher Dr. Elizabeth Paratz noted that, since SADS-related deaths occur so quickly upon onset, that it makes it difficult to determine the cause, or to get the patient the proper medical treatment they need to save their life in a timely manner.

“The majority of these SADS events, 90 per cent, occur outside the hospital – the person doesn’t make it – so it’s actually ambulance staff and forensics caring for the bulk of these patients,” she said. “I think even doctors underestimate it. We only see the 10 percent who survive and make it to hospital. We only see the tip of the iceberg ourselves.”

Death from SADS, Dr. Paratz said, can be an especially hard thing for a family to deal with, since sometimes the cause of death amounts to a “diagnosis of nothing,” preventing those left behind from obtaining closure.

Sudden arrhythmic death syndrome
Sudden Adult Death Syndrome (SADS) is considered an abbreviation for Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome (SADS according to the National Library of Medicine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1955549/

But the best advice she could give, Dr. Paratz said, would be for anyone under the age of 40 – especially if they have any family history of SADS – to get a complete heart exam as soon as possible.

“If you yourself have had a first-degree relative – a parent, sibling, child – who’s had an unexplained death, it’s extremely recommended you see a cardiologist,’ she said.


Comment via Facebook

Corrections: If you are aware of an inaccuracy or would like to report a correction, we would like to know about it. Please consider sending an email to corrections@publishedreporter.com and cite any sources if available. Thank you. (Policy)