Manhattan Probe Into Trump Organization Going Nowhere Fast; Dismissal Sought, Two Prosecutors Resign, D.A. Says Won’t Prosecute

Trump
Manhattan’s District Attorney, Alvin Bragg, seems to have abandoned the criminal prosecution of Trump’s company, the Trump Organization, and his former chief financial officer, Allen Weisselberg, that was brought by his predecessor Cyrus Vance, Jr. President Trump had denied the allegations, and accused the Manhattan D.A.’s office of conducting a political witch hunt. File photo: Evan El-Amin, Shutterstock.com, licensed.

NEW YORK, NY – Following the abrupt resignation of two prosecutors from the Manhattan district attorney’s investigation into the Trump Organization in late February, legal experts are noting that the case against the company of former President Donald Trump alleging financial fraud now appears to be unraveling.

After leading a three-year investigation into the former president and his company the previous Manhattan district attorney, Cyrus R. Vance Jr., handed the case to his successor, Alvin Bragg, after indicting the Trump Organization – and its chief bookkeeper, Allen Weisselberg, 73 – on 15 felony counts that included tax fraud and falsifying business records.

Trump himself has not yet been charged with a crime; but reports indicate that the investigation, which initially concentrated on alleged tax-evasion schemes, had started to broaden its scope to whether or not the Trump Organization – and Trump himself – artificially inflated or deflated the value of assets for loan and/or tax purposes.

Things looked worse for Trump when in mid-February, Mazars USA, his long-time accounting firm, cut ties with him, stating that ten years of his financial statements “should no longer be relied upon.”


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However, prosecutors Carey Dunne and Mark Pomerantz reportedly resigned in late February after Bragg – who had not presented any information to a grand jury for over a month – publicly expressed doubts about proceeding with the case against the Trump Organization.

While the exact reason for their departures is not clear, Bragg is refusing to release their resignation letters, claiming that they contain “too much information” that could impact an ongoing investigation. But it is speculated that the actual reason the letters are being withheld from the public – as opposed their being filled with sensitive information – is that the two former prosecutors deep criticism of Bragg’s handling of the Trump case would be an embarrassment.

Experts are also saying that another potential reason for the immense slowdown in the case against the Trump Organization may be related to the new DA and his staff not having the same bond and sense of trust with witnesses that the previous DA had built, which can be critically important when it comes to successful prosecutions.

By all reports, the investigation into the Trump Organization – and Trump himself – appears to be loosing steam and the only person who appears to know why – Bragg himself, isn’t talking.


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