Doctor Warns CDC to Re-Think COVID Vaccination for Kids After Teen Develops Heart Condition

How To Register and Own Website Addresses (.com, .net, .org, etc) For Under $20/year. [REGISTER YOUR DOMAINS]
To comply with FTC regulations, all links on this site could lead to commissions paid to the publisher. Please see Advertising Disclosure in sidebar.

EKG
Fabio Berlingieri’s 17 year-old son got the Pfizer jab – which is currently authorized for use in individuals aged 12 and older – in order to qualify to play soccer at his high school, but soon afterward he came home from practice complaining of chest pains. File photo: Photo credit ShutterStock.com, licensed.

A teenager who was inoculated against COVID-19 with the Pfizer vaccine as part of a school requirement to play sports has been sidelined after he developed a heart condition soon after receiving the dose, according to his heartbroken father who appeared Tuesday on Fox and Friends to support his son.

Fabio Berlingieri’s 17 year-old son got the Pfizer jab – which is currently authorized for use in individuals aged 12 and older – in order to qualify to play soccer at his high school, but soon afterward he came home from practice complaining of chest pains.

“A week later, he came home and started telling me that his heart was hurting every time he had a heartbeat,” Berlingieri said.

It was initially believed to be a pulled muscle, which is a common issue for athletes; however, the problem persisted, so Berlingieri said he took his son to have his heart examined at a local walk-in medical clinic. After an electrocardiogram (EKG) was performed to check for different problems, his son also visited a cardiologist, where he received a sonogram.



Big Tech is using NewsGuard to censor us severely reducing our revenue. You can support our mission of truthful reporting by making a contribution. Honest journalism is incredibly important to our democracy; we refuse to let Silicon Valley crush us into just another regurgitated, propaganda driven, echo-chamber of lamestream media and we need your support. You can also help by signing up for our featured story emails.
 

The next day the results of the testing came in, and at that point Berlingieri was told the bad news, prompting him to rush his son to the emergency room of their local hospital on the same day he was due to go to his high school prom; he remained under their care for several days.

“His troponin levels were off the charts,” Berlingieri said, referring to a group of proteins found in skeletal and heart (cardiac) muscle fibers that regulate muscular contraction; when heart muscles become damaged, troponin is sent into the bloodstream. His EKG was also “a little off,” according to his cardiologist.

Due to his heart condition, Berlinigieri said that his son was forced to miss his prom and can no longer engage in all the physical activities that he loves, such as playing soccer and surfing.

“What happened, I guess, is the oxygen doesn’t get in those areas. So it has to heal,” Berlinigieri said. “So he has to be very careful that he doesn’t do anything strenuous so his heart rate doesn’t increase and [put him in] danger of a heart attack.”

Children younger than 12 may become eligible for COVID-19 vaccines this fall, but Fox News medical contributor Dr. Nicole Saphier noted that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are being “irresponsible” and “cherry-picking” how the present their data, and that they should re-think their push to start vaccinating kids between the ages of 5 and 11.

“It’s an all or none approach. They say either adolescents are fully vaccinated or every single one of them is going to get COVID-19. That’s the way they are balancing it right now,” Saphier said. “It’s irresponsible. It doesn’t make sense. And the FDA needs to look a little bit closer at these vaccines before they continue having universal recommendations.”

Comment via Facebook

Corrections: If you are aware of an inaccuracy or would like to report a correction, we would like to know about it. Please consider sending an email to corrections@publishedreporter.com and cite any sources if available. Thank you. (Policy)