Faculty Face Challenges as SUNY Goes to Distance Learning

On Wednesday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that City and State University of New York campuses will switch to online learning for the majority of classes through the end of the academic year. File photo.

ALBANY, N.Y. – Faculty at SUNY campuses are moving quickly to make the transition to distance learning as classrooms close down in an effort to stop the spread of the new coronavirus.

On Wednesday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that City and State University of New York campuses will switch to online learning for the majority of classes through the end of the academic year.

Fred Kowal is president of United University Professions, the union representing SUNY faculty. He says developing a college course for online teaching typically takes months of preparation, but they have one week.

“We are working very closely with SUNY,” says Kowal. “They understand the scope of the challenge and that’s good because what is being undertaken is massive.”


FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION: GET ONLY 'FEATURED' STORIES BY EMAIL

Big Tech is using a content filtering system for online censorship. Watch our short video about NewsGuard to learn how they control the narrative for the Lamestream Media and help keep you in the dark. NewsGuard works with Big-Tech to make it harder for you to find certain content they feel is 'missing context' or stories their editors deem "not in your best interest" - regardless of whether they are true and/or factually accurate. They also work with payment processors and ad-networks to cut off revenue streams to publications they rate poorly by their same bias standards. This should be criminal in America. You can bypass this third-world nonsense by signing up for featured stories by email and get the good stuff delivered right to your inbox.
 

Yesterday, the University at Albany announced that a student there has been confirmed to have the new coronavirus. The switch to online learning will go into effect next Thursday.

Kowal notes that SUNY is allowing some latitude in how it approaches the transition, especially for classes that may require students to be on campus to complete their course work.

“Whether it’s a dance program at Brockport or a dairy-herd management course at Cobleskill or obviously our medical students at the four medical campuses,” says Kowal.

He adds that while the health and safety of faculty and students are the top priority, the academic quality of the university system also must be maintained.

Kowal points out that no one can predict how long it will be necessary to maintain the steps now being taken to stem the spread of the coronavirus.

“We are approaching it as a temporary situation, an emergency situation and as a way of ensuring that students can get through the remainder of the semester,” says Kowal. “Then, working with SUNY, hopefully we’ll be looking at a fall semester that will return to normal.”

Comment via Facebook

Corrections: If you are aware of an inaccuracy or would like to report a correction, we would like to know about it. Please consider sending an email to corrections@publishedreporter.com and cite any sources if available. Thank you. (Policy)