The Right Of Immigration?

While many claim migration to be a right, immigration, so far, is not. Every nation has some kind of immigration policy in place which, it might be assumed, serves the interests of the nation that has set policy, as a point having to do with efficient administration of national affairs. File photo: Pixabay.

HOLLYWOOD, FL – On October 10, 2018, at an immigration meeting at the Vatican, Pope Francis said, “To migrate is a human right, is that clear?…And no one can prevent that. Never forget.”

The Pope’s statement on that occasion was made in support of Central Americans in the United States with TPS (Temporary Protected Status), who seek to have it extended. 

While many people of Central America have pressing needs that immigration could fulfill, the same might be said of countless or billions of others. As it turns out, the world is plagued by famines, armed conflicts, and no shortage of totalitarian regimes.

But while the Pope and many others claim that migration is a right, immigration, so far, is not. Every nation has some kind of immigration policy in place which, it might be assumed, serves the interests of the nation that has set policy, as a point having to do with efficient administration of national affairs. That would seem a reasonable governmental function.

Various human rights advocacy groups claim, on the other hand, that immigration is a human rights issue, not a political issue. Such is the position of Aida V. Nieto, Bill Archer Fellow for Amnesty International USA, who with regard to illegal immigration into America said:

“It is time to change the rhetoric from “illegal aliens crawling across the border that come here to take our jobs and commit crimes” to “individuals looking for a better life.”

The implictions seem to be that America is exclusively where the better life must be found, while it is a human right to immigrate into America. And that limiting immigration into America must be an act of criminal aggression. But such a definition of reality would seem to discard the requirement of nations of the world to do anything to improve their own conditions.

If America were the only nation capable of creating conditions fit for human habitation, why would there any longer need to exist any other national or international governments, after having already established their inability adequately to administer the affairs under their jurisdictions?

If America were the only nation capable of creating conditions fit for human habitation, and if immigration into America were defined internationally as a human right, then other governments should no longer receive assistance of any kind from any national or international organizations; and America should then become the world government, with exclusive governmental jurisdiction over every part of Earth, including every aspect of governance. America would be, in that case, the policeman of the world, the world’s capital, and lawgiver, and judge.

But it does not work that way. The world wants not to fix its own problems. The world wants to run to America in order to escape the problems that the world refuses to struggle to fix. The world wants to keep its own jurisdiction, while forcing America to take up the slack for the world’s failures and inadequacies. And the world wants America to take in every person in need who wishes to immigrate into America, regardless of their background, orientation, customs, intentions, or any other criteria.

Some ingenuously believe that America is capable of bearing the burdens of all of the needy of the world, despite America’s teetering situation, struggling under a $22 trillion dollar debt, and growing financial responsibilities.

But some obviously and admittedly want America to fail. That is what the implementation of the Cloward-Piven Strategy is all about; after all, while pushing to maintain open borders that are certain to facilitate countless new arrivals who need to be enrolled in social welfare programs, eventually overburdening America’s ability to remain financially solvent. Those who implemented and maintain the strategy have not kept it a secret. It is part of the wider strategy to destroy America, which includes other tactics that are well known and which have been well promoted by Socialists, Marxists, and globalists of every stripe.

But if America were the only nation capable of creating and sustaining adequate conditions for human habitation, with relative prosperity, freedom, and justice, why should human rights advocacy organizations not be exclusively focused daily on condemning the inadequacies and abuses of totalitarian nations around the globe?

The world is certainly in great need of improvement. Not all of the needy of the world, however, could fit within the borders of America. And even if they could, not all of them agree with or would support America’s Constitution and norms, which are a large piece of the recipe required for keeping America prosperous and well administered under rule of law. Much of America’s current crisis has to do with the current failure of those already in America to enforce constitutional law, allowing all kinds of criminality to persist.

America is in danger of financial, moral, and administrative collapse. Incursions into tyranny are apparent. Economy is still under attack in various ways. And yet, the Pope, the human rights advocates, the globalists, and everyone with a vested interest continues to insist that immigration into America is a human right.

Rights, however, never exist in a vacuum. Rights are part of an immutable equation that includes responsibilities. And in addition, not even the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights has declared at any point in time that nations do not have the authority to determine who might be permitted to immigrate into them.

Comment via Facebook


Disclaimer: News articles on this site contain opinions of the author, and if opinion, may not necessarily reflect the views of the site itself or the views of the owners of The Published Reporter. For more information on our editorial policies please view our editorial policies and guidelines section in addition to our terms of service.