Mueller Says Manafort Faces Up To 24.5 Years In Prison

VIRGINIA – The special counsel’s office said Friday that former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort faces between 19 and 24.5 years in prison for the tax and bank fraud charges for which he was convicted in August.

Citing federal sentencing guidelines, prosecutors also said that Manafort faces a fine of up to $24 million for his fraud.

The longtime GOP operative was convicted on Aug. 21, 2018 on a series of charges related to income he received as a consultant for the Ukrainian government through 2014, more than two years before he joined the Trump campaign.

Manafort, who is 69 years old, also faced a separate trial in Washington, D.C., on foreign lobbying charges, but pleaded guilty to those crimes on Sept. 14, 2018. He entered a cooperation agreement with the special counsel as part of that deal, though prosecutors have since accused him of lying numerous times to investigators.

Prosecutors did not recommend a sentence for Manafort, but they did lay out the prison term they believe is warranted under federal sentencing guidelines.


FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTION: GET ONLY 'FEATURED' STORIES BY EMAIL

Big Tech is using a content filtering system for online censorship. Watch our short video about NewsGuard to learn how they control the narrative for the Lamestream Media and help keep you in the dark. NewsGuard works with Big-Tech to make it harder for you to find certain content they feel is 'missing context' or stories their editors deem "not in your best interest" - regardless of whether they are true and/or factually accurate. They also work with payment processors and ad-networks to cut off revenue streams to publications they rate poorly by their same bias standards. This should be criminal in America. You can bypass this third-world nonsense by signing up for featured stories by email and get the good stuff delivered right to your inbox.
 

Prosecutors were unrelenting in their criticism of Manafort.

“In the end, Manafort acted for more than a decade as if he were above the law, and deprived the federal government and various financial institutions of millions of dollars,” reads a court filing submitted by Andrew Weissmann, the top prosecutor handling the Manafort case.

“The sentence here should reflect the seriousness of these crimes, and serve to both deter Manafort and others from engaging in such conduct.”

Prosecutors also argued that in addition to Manafort’s role in orchestrating a bank and tax fraud scheme, his “history and characteristics” count as “aggravating factors” in his sentencing guideline.“Manafort has had every opportunity to succeed,” Weissmann wrote. 

Follow Chuck on Twitter


Comment via Facebook

Corrections: If you are aware of an inaccuracy or would like to report a correction, we would like to know about it. Please consider sending an email to corrections@publishedreporter.com and cite any sources if available. Thank you. (Policy)