An Anti-Termite Bites the Dust

WEST PALM BEACH – In yet another of his anti-Semitic declarations, Lou Farrakhan, recently declared that he is not an anti-Semite, but rather that he is an anti-Termite.

How unfortunate. Termites throughout the insect community should be incensed. 

Like the Jewish people, who transformed a desert into lush, forested and productive land, termites recycle dead and decaying trees into new highly fertile soil – creating the base for new, healthy forestation.

Termites can do what few other insects are able to do. Extremely tough, they are able to digest cellulose, which benefits themselves but also the bacteria and protozoa they host in a symbiotic relationship. They provide a safe environment for other important organisms while helping the growth of the land around them. So termites actually improve and support the lives of the other organisms they live with. 

Termites have strong family values – the male stays with the same female and they reproduce regularly. The male even helps feed their young. 

Termites stick together. Sensing danger, they rapidly communicate to the entire community by banging their heads against the wall of the colony. The Jewish people have been banging their heads against a wall trying to deal with anti-Semites for centuries 

I am sorry Lou, but termites have been around a long time – as long as 100 million years.  And here we are talking about them, while incidentally, history has no memory of a single anti-termite. The Jewish people have been around for 4,000 years, contributing to medicine, science, art, technology and the advancement of mankind far in excess of any other group of people in proportion to their numbers. The occasional anti-termite is unlikely to stop termites – and I can assure you that a loud-mouthed, self-entertaining, racist anti-Semite who turns on the very people who worked and sacrificed to support the march to equality of his own people,  won’t stop the Jewish people’s  amazing contributions to humanity either.

There are many trees in the forest – maple, pine, cedar, oak etc. Even the termites must deal with an occasional ash. It doesn’t slow them down.

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